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20130416
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ideology or some other crazy set of ideas lou: homeland security department secretary napolitano saying that she is convinced that this is not part of a larger plot that it is one instance. your reaction? >> you can't know that now. you can't. i think it is not part of an international plot. that is my hunch. i investigated cases with punches. at the time they were right, have the time they were wrong. i had to abandon a lot of punches that turned out to be wrong. you're asking me for my hunch, this is not orchestrated by al qaeda overseas. but this could very well be being done by homegrown people who were looking to try to do the same thing. or we could be all wrong and this could be some kind of other plot having to do with something that we have not even figured out yet. lou: so i infer from what you're saying that you think this is at most a small group of people working to carry out these terrorist attacks. not an individual. >> i don't think this is a major, a planned attack by an overseas group. i think it would be far bigger than what we saw if it were a planned attack. on the
've been working with secretary napolitano and find the way to provide jammers to local police. as far as those with detonators, there is no, other than having more dogs, more surveillance and that appears to what happened here. if it was a detonator, only way to stop there, if there were more police dogs constantly screening the area and, again, we, you know, when there is after-action report from the boston police department we'll have a better idea what happened, how those ieds got there. bill: yeah. understood. did you say jammers? i want to be clear on that, is that the word you used? >> jammers. yeah, jammers can be used against remote controls. bill: what would they do? >> they would prevent an ied going off. it would prevent the person trying to set it off by remote control, it would prevent that from happening. we used them in afghanistan. we used them in iriraq. bill: yeah, i asked that because apparently cell phone service and e-mail service was down several hours month afternoon. were jammers used in the boston after the attack it is. >> i'm not sure. could have been cell p
napolitano, director of f.b.i., you have the head of -- director of the n.s.a., alexander, and all three have said, they said one of the biggest fears they have now are these attacks and that unless we have a sharing opportunity between government and between business they feel they cannot protect our country from these cyberattacks the way we should. it's important we act now on this bill. now, we can pass bills in the house all day long, but if the senate doesn't pass a bill and the president doesn't sign it, where are we? we were able to pass our bill last year in a bipartisan manner, and yet our bill went to the senate and it stalled. the bill didn't go anywhere. so chairman rogers and i started again, but what we said to each other and we discussed was that we need to address the issue of privacy because even though we felt strongly that our bill does protect privacy, we knew there was -- there were groups out there, especially the privacy groups, felt there was not enough protection in our bill. we rolled up our sleeves. we listened to the issues raised by the privacy groups. the admini
rights. here to explain is fox news judge andrew napolitano. he was finally read his miranda rights. you have to do that within 48 hours? >> theoretically miranda rights should be read immediately as soon as the person is in custody, before you ask him any questions. we don't know exactly what's happened, we'll find out, but the government told us it did not read him his miranda rights, interrogated him for intelligence, not law enforcement purposes. this is highly controversial and could affect the government's case. but at some point in that interrogation which only lasted a few hours, which apparently consisted of him writing answers because he can't speak due to the injury to his throat. at some point in that interrogation, agents, professional interrogators decided we're not going to get anywhere or we've already learned everything we can learn from him. they also have on their shoulder, breathing down their neck, so to speak, a federal rule of procedure which requires he be charged with something within 48 hours. otherwise they have to let him go. they did charge him with this comp
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4